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Society of Women Engineers

Video: SWE President’s Message for June 2017

FY17 SWE President Jessica Rannow discusses the Society’s many accomplishments during the last fiscal year as her term in office comes to an end.

Published On: June 2017

 

FY17 SWE President Jessica Rannow recorded her last President’s Message before her final board meeting as her term comes to an end. In this video, Jessica discusses the Society’s many accomplishments during the last fiscal year.

WE16

WE16, the world’s largest conference for women engineers, was in Philadelphia in 2016. We had over 11,700 attendees, a record number.

SWENext Program

SWENext is a way to become part of the Society of Women Engineers as a student through the age of 18. Become part of SWE and #BeThatEngineer! Joining is free. Families and educators play a key role in the success of SWENexters. The SWENext program offers resources and information for adult advocates as well. Any student 13 or older may join SWENext. For those younger than 13, a parent will need to be the primary contact. Students please complete the application to join. Adult advocates who would like to be on the SWENext mailing list: Please complete the mailing list form.

Constance and Nano Comic Book

Engineers are always finding creative, exciting ways to make our world awesome! Join Constance and Nano on their engineering adventures to see how fun solving problems with science, engineering, technology and math can be! Download their latest adventure for FREE and share it with your friends, parents and teachers!

WE Local

WE Local offers networking with fellow technical women who live in the surrounding area. Educational workshops and engaging sessions provide professional development designed specifically for women in engineering and technology. Attendees have the opportunity to meet with potential employers and connect with colleagues while developing their skills. WE Local conferences are innovative, collaborative events. SWE sections along with SWE Headquarters work together to “Meet Locally. Learn Socially.” Learn more about WE Local Conferences in 2018.

STEM Re-entry Program

The 2017 Task Force white paper demonstrates the value proposition of the STEM Re-entry Task Force through interviews with Founding Members of the Task Force.

Access to the 2017 STEM Re-entry Task Force White Paper: An Intervention Strategy to Re-engage Women Engineers in the Workforce

Without intervention strategies, the current demand for technical talent combined with the projected increase in the need for engineers will result in a significant shortage of skilled labor throughout the United States engineering industry.

Increasing the persistence of women in engineering at all stages of their careers is imperative to solving this talent shortage. As this white paper illustrates, while more women are graduating with four-year degrees than men, they are underrepresented in the engineering industry – especially within positions at the senior and executive levels. Women are also more likely than men to leave the engineering profession (Corbett & Hill, 2015).

In envisioning an intervention strategy to re-engage female engineers who have left the workforce, the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and iRelaunch created the STEM Re-entry Task Force (Task Force).

Through the STEM Re-entry Task Force, engineering and technology organizations can develop cost-effective re-entry programs to attract an underutilized source of talent. (Within this context, re-entry programs are defined as formal internship programs developed by organizations to recruit individuals on a career break of two years or more back into the workforce to fill critical talent shortages. All re-entry programs are equal employment opportunities.)

Without incorporating re-entry programs as part of their overall recruitment strategies, organizations risk ignoring a valuable and largely unexplored source of talent. In addition, diversifying talent pipelines and increasing gender diversity not only addresses labor shortages, but it also fosters innovation (Dezso & Ross, 2012) and increases competitiveness in the global marketplace.

Sponsored by:
SWE – SWE Research and Stats