Your News. Your Community. Your Voice.

Society of Women Engineers

Women Engineers You Should Know: Lisa Thee

Women engineers make real change in the workplace and in our communities. We honor them in our SWE Magazine series “Women Engineers You Should Know.”

Published On: November 2017

This article is part of SWE Magazine’s Spring 2017 Issue. To view it on your mobile device, download the SWE Magazine app! Download it on the App Store or get it on Google Play.

LISA THEE

A solution owner in the analytics and artificial intelligence end-to-end solutions team in Intel’s Data Center Group, Lisa Thee is a trailblazer in the fight against human trafficking and sexual exploitation of children. Thee led a team of principal engineers and data scientists across Intel for more than a year, performing proof of concepts and contextual inquiries to define a partnership with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), a leading nonprofit in child safety.

She is now leading a team to decrease the processing time for reports of child sexual exploitation made to NCMEC’s Cybertipline. It can currently take up to 30 days to process some reports and Thee’s team hopes to reduce this to one day. She is also working alongside NCMEC’s partners, Google and Microsoft, on an analytics platform to connect tools from each company for a streamlined solution for the NCMEC analysts.

Outside of work, Thee is the founder of the GILA project (Gender Injustice to Lifetime Achievement), a Sacramento-based program connecting local nonprofits to support trafficking and domestic violence survivors who have little or no work history, so they may transition into the workforce and from shelter housing to sustainable independence.

Thee received a Bachelor of Applied Science, industrial and operations research engineering, from the University of Michigan.

Who Are the Women Engineers We Should Know?

women engineersQuite often, those who are behind the scenes and out of the limelight make real change in the workplace and in our communities. It is our intention to recognize such women and make their efforts better known in our SWE Magazine series “Women Engineers You Should Know.”

Casting a wide net, SWE Magazine staff and editorial board members seek contemporary women whose lives have embodied the Society’s mission to: “Stimulate women to achieve full potential in careers as engineers and leaders, expand the image of the engineering profession as a positive force for improving the quality of life, and demonstrate the value of diversity.”

Through a variety of means, including fielding suggestions and conducting archival research, we will examine the stories of many women who have made a difference in these critical areas. Determining a final list is a daunting challenge, and our selections are in no way meant to be definitive. While some names you may recognize, many are not recognizable to most people. From a variety of perspectives, in different environments and moments in time, these women represent “ordinary” when doing “extraordinary” things. In saluting them, we are saluting all the women, known and unknown, past and present, who have advanced our mission.

Nominate women engineers to know for our next article. The deadline for submission of names is December 15, 2017. Submit nominations here.

With each submission, please include the following.

  • Nominee info: name, why her, links supporting your nomination, areas of expertise, where is she located
  • Nominator info: name, email, how you know the nominee

Thanks for your help, and look for the Spring 2018 issue of SWE Magazine.

Sponsored by:
Brown – Executive Master