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SWE Leadership Summit Update

Intel’s Women at Intel Network (WIN) is the largest Intel Employee Resource Group, with a global budget of 100K, and chapters and membership at nearly all Intel locations, both in the US and internationally. Most of Intel’s largest US sites are also located in close proximity to large and active SWE sections, especially in the California Bay Area, Phoenix and Portland metro areas. As a result, there is a lot of overlap in membership at these sites. One of the largest differences for an Intel employee between WIN and SWE is that WIN includes both technical and non-technical Intel employees. SWE on the other hand is obviously completely technical, and includes members from Intel as well as other local companies. However, the opportunities to partner between the two organizations have been many, and largely successful for both organizations.

One such partnership that took place between the WIN section in Intel Oregon and the SWE Columbia River Section was for a showing of Girl Rising, an inspirational film focusing on issues of Girls’ education around the world. As a main sponsor of the film, Intel was able to provide free showings of the full length film, as long as it was organized through an Intel employee group.

As the issues of girls’ education are also a big focus for SWE, this was a perfect opportunity to partner on a joint event. Intel Oregon WIN procured the film and arranged to show it at an auditorium on the Intel campus, advertising it to WIN members and their families. The SWE Columbia River Section also advertised the showing as a joint event with WIN to their membership.

The planning team decided the film would be free to members either from WIN or from the local SWE section, but that they would charge $5 for viewers who were not members of either organization. The money collected then went towards the Columbia River Section’s scholarship fund, a clear win for both the section and girls’ education! Speakers from both groups kicked off the event, sharing info on their respective organizations and how their groups made a difference in girls’ education worldwide.

Attendance was well over 100 people, and over $150 was raised for the scholarship fund. Both groups shared the cost of snacks for the event, and both benefited from the publicity, unique event opportunity, and from joining forces on cost and volunteers to plan and run the event. This was a great example of SWE/ERG collaboration on an event that was mutually beneficial and aligned to the charters of both groups.

Do you have an ERG related story? Submit your ideas for content to: socialmedia@swe.org and don’t forget to hashtag #SWEmyERG if you post about your SWE-related ERG on social media.

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