What Do Engineers REALLY Do?

Engineering especially makes a big difference to those who are most in need. Engineers identify a problem that many people are facing, and they solve it!
What Do Engineers REALLY Do? -

Engineering is more than just math and science. Engineering makes all of our lives better. Engineering especially makes a big difference to those who are most in need. Engineers identify a problem that many people are facing, and they solve it!

Just a few things that engineers do with their knowledge are:

Engineers started their academic and professional careers with dreams. In fact, many of them dreamed of being engineers when they were kids, just like you! When they grew up, Engineers made those dreams a reality. Once those dreams become a reality, Engineers can design things that make the world a better place! You can be that engineer, too! 

Bonus Activity:

One of the scary things about earthquakes is that sometimes they can cause buildings to fall down. That can cause people to get hurt or worse. Engineers see this problem and they solve it. They design buildings that can stay standing after an earthquake to protect the people inside. How would you design a safer building to protect people from earthquakes?

Get the help of an adult in your life and put your engineering skills to the test! Design a building that can withstand earthquakes using Jell-O.

What you’ll need: 

  • 30 toothpicks
  • 30 mini marshmallows
  • 1 baking dish (8 ½ inch x 8 ½ inch or 8 ½ inch x 11 inch) 
  • 1 box of Jell-O: have an adult help you make the Jell-O in the baking dish by following the directions on the Jell-O box 

Once your Jell-O is ready:

  1. Start building your house on the Jell-O. 
  2. Shake your dish around so the Jell-O jiggles. 
  3. See if your building is still standing. 
  4. Keep re-designing your building until it stays standing with the Jell-O earthquakes!

Author(s) Information

  • What Do Engineers REALLY Do?

    Allison Osmanson

    Allison Osmanson is a Materials Science and Engineering PhD student at the University of Texas at Arlington. She holds a Master’s degree in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of North Texas and she earned her Bachelor’s degree in Materials Science and Engineering from Washington State University. She plans to graduate in December 2021, after which, she will be a Microelectronics Packaging Engineer at Texas Instruments in Dallas, Texas.

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