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Society of Women Engineers

Podcast: Climate Control Study

Lead researcher Joan C. Williams discusses SWE’s Climate Control study, which suggests the engineering workplace is tougher for women and people of color as compared to white men.

Published On: January 2017

In the latest Diverse podcast, FY17 President of the Society of Women Engineers Jessica Rannow discusses SWE’s Climate Control study with lead researcher Joan C. Williams, Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of California Hastings College of Law and Founding Director of the Center for WorkLife Law. The results of the study suggest the engineering workplace climate is tougher for women and people of color than it is for white men.

You can also learn more about the study, Climate Control: Gender and Racial Bias in Engineering, on SWE’s research website: research.swe.org. You’ll find interesting statistics from the study and comments from women engineers who completed the survey.

 

 

Our Diverse podcast is brought to you by SWE Advance, supporting the recruitment, retention and advancement of women in engineering through career resources, professional development and one-to-one networking opportunities.

(Jessica Rannow)

Hi, I’m Jessica Rannow, FY17 President of the Society of Women Engineers and this is SWE’s Diverse podcast series. Please remember to add this podcast to your iTunes and like or follow us on social media. Visit swe.org for more details.

Joining me now is Joan C. Williams, Distinguished Professor of law at the University of California, Hastings College of Law, and Founding Director of the Center for WorkLife Law. Joan partnered with the Society of Women Engineers to conduct a study that we call: Climate Control: Gender and Racial Bias in Engineering. The results of the study suggest that the engineering workplace climate is tougher for women and people of color as compared to white men.

(Questions/Discussion)

Tell us a little bit about your career and educational background.

The Climate Control study was conducted last year and released in the fall. More than 3,000 professionals with at least two years’ experience as engineers or engineering technicians completed a survey. Respondents were asked questions relating to four basic patterns of implicit bias: Prove-It-Again, Tightrope, Maternal Wall and Tug of War. Joan, tell us more about those four types of bias.

The study found not just gender bias, but racial bias, right?

The study captured a lot of comments at the end of the survey. Were you surprised by the amount of comments you received?

What are the key points you hope people take away from this study?

(Conclusion)

To learn more about the study, go to Climate Control.

And find more great Divers podcasts on iTunes.

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